Will adenoviral conjunctivitis or epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) get cured by 5% betadine?

epidemic-keratoconjunctivitDo you believe that the age old common antiseptic is potent to cure such a malicious disease?

The news is certainly incredible. The research has been undertaken by Dr Daniel Goldberg and he feels that the research will prove fruitful. FDA has approved the use of 5% Betadine for treating EKC. Recently, Dr. Goldberg has invited doctors from all over the world to register for participation in establishing an effective protocol.

Adenoviral conjunctivitis is a dreaded eye disease. Adult patient presents with 6-day history of watery, irritated eyes noted that the left eye was tearing, slightly blurry, and starting to get red throughout prior to presentation. The eye gradually became increasingly red and irritated over the ensuing 2 days and the patient noted increased crusting in the mornings. There was a mild "scratchy" sensation noted then. Symptoms did not remit with antibiotic drops and eye continued to worsen, with early redness and watery sensation in the contralateral eye as well. Nne week prior to any ocular symptoms, patient had an upper respiratory infection which had subsided spontaneously .

The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis is extraordinary, with studies documenting adenovirus in a range of 20% to 91% of all conjunctivitis worldwide. Like hurricanes, outbreaks of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis(EKC) have been given names and histories.  Effective measures target prevention.  Treatment is generally supportive, and there is no established antiviral therapy.

For more than 4 decades Betadine® Microbicides have been used in homes and hospitals worldwide as an important first line of defense against topical infections. Betadine Microbicides help to reduce bacteria that potentially can cause skin infection.

Povidone-iodine, the active ingredient in Betadine® Microbicides is active against most gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant strains, as well as most fungi, protozoa, and viruses in vitro.

Dr Daniel Goldberg, a leading New Jersey ophthalmologist is coordinating a new study to measure the effectiveness of using 5% Betadine irrigation for treatment of acute EKC — a common, worldwide, highly contagious and often severe form of conjunctivitis with the potential for long term visual impairment due to corneal involvement.

Ophthalmologists around the world are invited to register to participate in the Betadine for EKC study. The purpose of the new study is to confirm the effectiveness of this protocol and to expand the awareness amongst eye care professionals of this inexpensive treatment for EKC.

bottlesOphthalmologists have become experienced with 5% Betadine irrigation as a pre-operative antiseptic, and 5% Betadine is now available as an FDA approved product which can be used 'off-label' to treat EKC.  This agent has minimal toxicity when used properly and followed by saline irrigation.  In vitro, povidone iodine is effective against adenovirus as well as many other infectious agents.  Prior trial with 1.5% Betadine to treat adenovirus conjunctivitis in children was inconclusive, and this study will test the use of 5% solution to treat EKC in adults.

Further, the availability of an in-office immunoassay test can confirm the presence of adenovirus infection prior to treatment which will yield more powerful data.  For humanitarian reasons, where cost or availability of RPS testing is problematic, we will collect data from patients with clinical diagnosis of EKC who are treated per protocol.

Our purpose is to confirm the effectiveness of our protocol using 5% Betadine irrigation for treatment of acute EKC and to expand the awareness amongst eye care professionals of this inexpensive treatment for EKC—a common, worldwide, highly contagious and often severe form of conjunctivits with the potential for long term visual sequelae due to corneal involvement- as quoted by Dr. Goldberg.

The test is covered under CPT Code 87809—Infectious agent antigen detection by immunoassay with direct optical observation: Adenovirus. Medicare reimbursement is approximately $17 and cost of test from RPS is $13.

Thus we will be optimistically eyeing on the developments that would be coming up effective to cure those affected from EKC, and would surely help to save the eye sight of many.

Source: PR Web

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One Response to “Will adenoviral conjunctivitis or epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) get cured by 5% betadine?”

  1. Bing Says:

    Wow! Haven’t heard this before but this is surely helpful. When it comes to eye care [www.google.com/url?sa=D&q=www.shadygroveeye.com] we should make necessary research and take some tips to keep them working well.

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